Wednesday, February 23, 2011

New book reminds of 'Humanae Vitae' importance in today's world



According to experts, the encyclical 'Humanae Vitae' (On Human Life) was a document ahead of its time. Paul VI wrote it in 1968 in a historical period of time that was marked by the student revolution. The encyclical provoked a large response that we still hear about today.

Msgr. Enrico dal Covolo
Rector, Pontifical Lateran University (Rome)

“This encyclical was published in 1968, in a time of global actions, of social revolution. Now we can appreciate the importance of the content in 'Humanae Vitae' and its current validity.”

In the 'Humanae Vitae', Paul VI clearly and precisely explains the Church's position on sexuality, premarital sex and human dignity from the moment of conception.

Issues that people continue to debate.

Forty-three years after its publication, scientific advancements have brought new challenges, such as the Church's stance on in vitro fertilization or new methods of contraception.

With this book, the Lateran University in Rome recalls with clarity the Magisterium of the Church, to shed light on these new questions.

Msgr. Enrico dal Covolo
Rector, Pontifical Lateran University (Rome)
ORIG ITALIAN
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“The doctrine of the Church has not changed in the least, but the problems facing it have grown. For example, technology and science have developed in relation to the origin of life. The most important thing is to think together about the deeper meaning of human sexuality, which according to the doctrine of the Church, in the end, under no circumstance can procreation distance itself from marriage.”

It's a book that remembers the most important encyclical of Paul VI and also provides a clear and positive vision of controversial and sensitive issues for Christians and non-Christians around the world.

Source:  Rome Reports

1 comment:

Judy said...

There is just a slight oversight here: what is the name of the book? It is never once mentioned, other than, " the book", or, this book".

Thank you!