Thursday, April 11, 2013

Adult stem cells helping teen with 'brittle bone disease' grow

Terry, Elizabeth and Mary Lobato pose with the Pontifical Hero Award on April 11, 2013. Credit: Stephen Driscoll/CNA.

Another endorsement for adult stem cell therapy:

Here's the story from CNA:

A girl whose bones used to break every two months was awarded for her courage in successfully battling her disease during a stem cell research conference at the Vatican.

“It feels amazing to win an award like this,” said Elizabeth Lobato, who was given the Pontifical Hero Award April 11 at the Second International Adult Stem Cell Conference in Vatican City.

“I heard I was the first to get this award from Rome and that’s awesome,” said the 14-year-old in an interview with CNA.

Elizabeth was diagnosed with osteogenesis imperfecta, commonly known as brittle bone disease, when she was just 10 months old. People affected by illness – which is caused by a genetic defect – often suffer from muscle weakness, hearing loss, loose joints, curved bones, scoliosis, brittle teeth and short stature.

But the teenager has grown over 13 inches since she began the adult stem cell treatment that involves her receiving bone marrow-derived stem cells from her father.

Read more.

Related story: STEM CELLS: Vatican honors Riverside girl for medical treatment

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