Thursday, July 31, 2008

TAKE ACTION: PJ MYERS IN THE CLEAR

I haven't blogged on the PJ Myers case because the whole thing has sickened me to the max. I have however, linked to The Curt Jester and Jimmy Akin who have done a great job of reporting on the willful and violent desecration of the Holy Eucharist by this bigoted Professor at University of Minnesota. However, I believe I would be neglectful in my duties if I didn't say something about this unholy event. PJ Myers is obviously an attention-seeking individual who enjoys doing hurtful things to God and to others, especially Catholics. He is a spiritually and psychologically sick individual, who in his own words says, "Nothing must be held sacred." (This man is in desperate need of prayer! And I have been praying for him!) I wonder which religious group he will intentionally hurt next?

On another level, he has openly discriminated against and harassed Catholics for no other reason than he doesn't agree with the most sacred and fundamental belief of our faith -- that Jesus is truly present in the Holy Eucharist. He has taken that which is holy (that he shouldn't have had in the first place) and has treated it (Him) in the most vile manner possible. What gives Myers the right to do this?

To add injury to insult, on July 25, the University of Minnesota (UMN) at Morris issued a statement by its chancellor, Jacqueline Johnson, which began with the following paragraph: “I believe that behaviors that discriminate against or harass individuals or groups on the basis of their religious beliefs are reprehensible. The University of Minnesota Board of Regents Policy: [sic] Code of Conduct prohibits such behavior in the workplace—of course this includes the classroom—and I expect those who work and study here to comply with that policy.” She then proceeded to say that Professor Paul Z. Myers, who intentionally (and with malice) desecrated the Eucharist, was expressing his own views and not those of UMN.

That's it - no firing, no punishment of any sort for this outrageous behavior?

Catholic League president Bill Donohue issued a news release the same day, saying, “This is classic: Johnson admits Myers has violated the UMN’s Code of Conduct and then proceeds to tell us why he is being allowed to do so with impunity—it’s a matter of academic freedom.”

Discrimination and harrassment against Catholics is a matter of academic freedom? Immoral behavior and intentional desecration of the Holy Eucharist is a matter of academic freedom? Willful, intentional, violent acts are performed and the professor gets off scott-free?

Johnson faxed a letter to Donohue today saying she needed to address his “misunderstanding” of her statement. She makes it plain that because Myers posted his comments on his personal blog, he did not violate UMN’s Code of Conduct.

Donohue sent Johnson the following letter today:

“I am sorry for my generosity: I took it that the reason you began your statement of July 25 with a citation of UMN’s Code of Conduct as it applies to religious intolerance was your way of acknowledging Myers’ delinquency. I now stand corrected: Your comment was simply a ploy—a cute way of acknowledging that something was wrong, but certainly not anything that would demand your attention. And just so you don’t misunderstand me: You could have issued a statement saying that while UMN has no authority over what Myers says in his blog, it is morally indefensible for anyone to intentionally desecrate the Eucharist. But, no, you couldn’t even say that. Instead, you hide behind legalisms. We will let the Catholic community know of your decision.”

I agree with Jimmy Akin, this man must be fired!

To voice your opinion on this subject, contact the offices of the president and the chancellor:

President Robert H. Bruininks
202 Morrill Hall100 Church Street
S.E.University of Minnesota
Minneapolis, MN 55455
Via phone: 612-626-1616
Via fax: 612-625-3875
Via e-mail: upres@umn.edu

Chancellor Jacqueline Johnson
309 Behmler Hall
600 East 4th StreetMorris, MN 56267
320-589-6020
E-mail: grussing@morris.umn.edu

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